Let's be a subject

Emancipation. Anti-capitalism. Queerness. Veganity. Marx my words through Badiou.

September 22, 2014 at 8:01am
90 notes
Reblogged from bemusedbibliophile

If I am always constituted by norms that are not of my making, then I have to understand the ways that constitution takes place. The staging and structuring of affect and desire is clearly one way in which norms work their way into what feels most properly to belong to me. The fact that I am other to myself precisely at the place where I expect to be myself follows from the fact that the sociality of norms exceeds my inception and my demise, sustaining a temporal and spatial field of operation that exceeds my self-understanding.

— Judith Butler, “Introduction: Acting in Concert,” Undoing Gender, pg.15 (via bemusedbibliophile)

(via praxisandcapital)

4:01am
47 notes
Reblogged from shedresseskindaprochoice

For many New Zealanders in the lowest 50 per cent, the picture is not one of wealth but of debt: the 200,000 poorest (in wealth terms) owe a combined total of $4.7 billion. No one in the poorest fifth of New Zealand owns more than $6000 in assets. The typical household has a net worth of just under $70,000. Between them, the entire lower half of the country’s adults, some 1.45 million people, own just 5 per cent of all wealth, around $23 billion. In other words, the wealthiest 1 per cent of New Zealanders together own three times as much as is owned collectively by the poorest 50 per cent of the population

— Max Rashbrooke: “Inequality and New Zealand”, Inequality: A New Zealand Crisis, ed. Max Rashbrooke, 22. (via shedresseskindaprochoice)

(via infamousnerdyjewishgrrrl)

September 16, 2014 at 12:00pm
1,183 notes
Reblogged from fuckyeahanarchistbanners
thepeoplesrecord:

fuckyeahanarchistbanners:

There Are No Prisons In A Queer Paradise // San Francisco, CA, USA // Free the gay shame 3

Prisons are for burning.

thepeoplesrecord:

fuckyeahanarchistbanners:

There Are No Prisons In A Queer Paradise // San Francisco, CA, USA // Free the gay shame 3

Prisons are for burning.

8:01am
132,185 notes
Reblogged from exgynocraticgrrl

kittydoom:

exgynocraticgrrl:

Breaking The Male Code: After Steubenville, A Call To Action

 (Left to Right): Peter Buffett, Jimmie Briggs, Joe Ehrmann, Tony Porter,
 Dave Zirin and Moderator Eve Ensler.

MIC DROP

(via dentonsocialists)

4:01am
24,957 notes
Reblogged from exgynocraticgrrl

Malcolm X on "Progress"

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via dentonsocialists)

September 11, 2014 at 12:01pm
54 notes
Reblogged from chinesekleptocracy

We have always lived in slums and holes in the wall. We will know how to accommodate ourselves for a while. For you must not forget that we can also build. It is we who built these palaces and cities, here in Spain and America and everywhere. We, the workers. We can build others to take their place. And better ones. We are not in the least afraid of ruins. We are going to inherit the earth; there is not the slightest doubt about that. The bourgeoisie might blast and ruin its own world before it leaves the stage of history. We carry a new world here, in our hearts. That world is growing in this minute.

— Buenaventura Durutti (via boomsticks-and-firewater)

(Source: chinesekleptocracy, via runofthemillsocialist)

4:01am
102 notes
Reblogged from pseudointellectualptyltd

The Iranian government broke our bones but never our spirit, the Australian government broke our spirit

— 

Morteza, an Iranian Refugee (Living with the Enemy ep 2). I assume it will be on SBS demand so watch it if you get the chance. (via pseudointellectualptyltd)

Destroy this shit smear of a country, burn it to the ground.

(via bustakay)

(via bustakay)

September 10, 2014 at 4:00pm
314 notes
Reblogged from critical-theory
critical-theory:

The only explanation of Baudrillard you’ll ever need.

critical-theory:

The only explanation of Baudrillard you’ll ever need.

(via bearinganddistance)

12:01pm
187 notes
Reblogged from commovente

Cultural essentialism often poses a pressing problem for feminist agendas in Third World contexts, given that essentialist constructions of particular Third World “cultures” often play a powerful ongoing role in political movements that are inimical to women’s interests in various parts of the Third World. These essentialist portraits of culture often depict culturally dominant norms of femininity, and practices that adversely affect women, as central components of “cultural identity.” They often equate women’s conformity to the status quo with “the preservation of culture” and cast feminist challenges to norms and practices affecting women as “cultural betrayals.” In such essentialist constructions of culture, norms and practices affecting the social status and roles of women are often represented as of central import to the task of “resisting westernization” and “preserving national culture,” reducing Third World feminist contestations of local norms and practices pertaining to women as “betrayals of Nation and Culture.” When essentialist definitions of Third World cultures are cloaked in the virtuous mantle of resistance to Western cultural imperialism, Third World feminists and others who contest prevailing norms and practices are discursively set up in the roles of “cultural traitors” and “stooges of Western imperialism.” In addition, essentialist pictures of “national culture and traditions” often operate to justify the exploitation, domination, and marginalization of religious and ethnic minorities, and members of socially subordinate castes and the poor; and they are used to dismiss a variety of political demands for justice, equality, rights, or democracy as symptoms of the “cultural corruption” wrought by “Western ideas” (Mayer 1995, Howard 1993). These moves are often startlingly exemplified in the political rhetoric and maneuvers of many Third World fundamentalist and conservative political movements.

Given that essentialist definitions of culture are often deployed in ways that are detrimental to the interests of many members of the national community, including various groups of women, I would argue that feminists have a serious stake in challenging such definitions. Viable postcolonial feminist perspectives need to engage in rethinking the prevailing portraits of “Western culture” and of different Third World cultures, rather than assisting in their replication and reification by conflating political resistance to Western domination and intrusion with essentialist notions of “cultural difference” and “cultural preservation.”

— Uma Narayan, from her essay “Essence of Culture and a Sense of History: A Feminist Critique of Cultural Essentialism,” Hypatia, Vol. 13  (via commovente)

(via nuanced-subversion)

8:02am
27 notes
Reblogged from feelingpolitical

We can complicate, for instance, the centrality of biopolitical reproductive biologism by expanding the terrain of who reproduces and what is reproduced, dislodging the always already implicit heterosexual frame, interrogating how the production of identity categories such as gay, lesbian, and even queer work in the service of the management, reproduction, and regeneration of life rather than being predominantly understood as implicitly or explicitly targeted for death. pressing Butler on her focus on how queers have been left to die, it is time to ask: How do queers reproduce life, and which queers are folded into life? How do they give life? To what do they give life? How is life weighted, disciplined into subjecthood, narrated into
population, and fostered for living? Does this secularization of queers entail deferred death or dying for others, and if so, for whom?

— Puar, Terrorist Assemblages, 35-6 (via feelingpolitical)

(via anarchacannibalism)

4:01am
13 notes
Reblogged from rvd420

[T]he revolutionary movement must accord a central place to criticism of culture and everyday life. But any examination of these phenomena must first of all be disabused, not respectful toward the given modes of communication. The very foundations of existing cultural relations must be contested by the critique that the revolutionary movement needs to really bring to bear on all aspects of life and human relationships.

— Guy Debord (via rvd420)

(via hmmnnn)

September 7, 2014 at 12:00pm
32,264 notes
Reblogged from faehui

(Source: faehui, via kako-mirai)

8:01am
183 notes
Reblogged from mahakavi

“Indian Country” was/is the term used in Viet Nam, Afghanistan, Iraq by the U.S. military for ‘enemy territory’. The first Black American President said without blinking, “There was a point before folks had left, before we had gotten everybody back on the helicopter and were flying back to base, where they said Geronimo has been killed, and Geronimo was the code name for bin Laden.” Elmer Pratt, Black Panther leader, falsely imprisoned for 27 years, was a Vietnam Veteran, was nicknamed ‘Geronimo’. Geronimo is settler nickname for the Bedonkohe Apache warrior who fought Mexican and then U.S. expansion into Apache tribal lands. The Colt .45 was perfected to kill Indigenous people during the ‘liberation’ of what became the Philippines, but it was first invented for the ‘Indian Wars’ in North America alongside The Hotchkiss Canon- a gattling gun that shot canonballs. The technologies of the permanent settler war are reserviced for foreign wars, including boarding schools, colonial schools, urban schools run by military personnel.
It is properly called Indian Country.

— Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang, Decolonization is not a metaphor (via vul-va)

(Source: mahakavi, via amodernmanifesto)

4:01am
183 notes
Reblogged from mahakavi

“Indian Country” was/is the term used in Viet Nam, Afghanistan, Iraq by the U.S. military for ‘enemy territory’. The first Black American President said without blinking, “There was a point before folks had left, before we had gotten everybody back on the helicopter and were flying back to base, where they said Geronimo has been killed, and Geronimo was the code name for bin Laden.” Elmer Pratt, Black Panther leader, falsely imprisoned for 27 years, was a Vietnam Veteran, was nicknamed ‘Geronimo’. Geronimo is settler nickname for the Bedonkohe Apache warrior who fought Mexican and then U.S. expansion into Apache tribal lands. The Colt .45 was perfected to kill Indigenous people during the ‘liberation’ of what became the Philippines, but it was first invented for the ‘Indian Wars’ in North America alongside The Hotchkiss Canon- a gattling gun that shot canonballs. The technologies of the permanent settler war are reserviced for foreign wars, including boarding schools, colonial schools, urban schools run by military personnel.
It is properly called Indian Country.

— Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang, Decolonization is not a metaphor (via vul-va)

(Source: mahakavi, via amodernmanifesto)

September 4, 2014 at 4:01am
4 notes
Reblogged from reclaimuoa

Student action has been an essential part of changes in discourse throughout New Zealand history. From opposition to apartheid to standing alongside Ngāti Whātua at Bastion Point, students from each generation have helped to push New Zealand towards becoming a more progressive society. This generation of students is defined by burgeoning debt, the lack of student and staff control over the university and our university’s academic co-operation with the oppressive Israeli regime. Seeking to combat this and reclaim the role of the university as the ‘critic and conscience of society’, students across the nation are coordinating a joint effort to regain control of our education.

— Reclaim UoA (via reclaimuoa)